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Painting on wet paint

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Painting on wet paint

Post by sarahkvotta on Mon May 11, 2015 9:41 pm

hi there,

I struggle with painting quickly for wiggly kids. I'm fairly new to face painting. I think I have a hard time with getting a good base color with solid coverage and then jumping right in with my white just to have my white pick up the base color and smudge everything together. Do you let your base color sit to dry or blow on their face? I feel like I'm not getting good enough coverage on my base color if my sponges are dryer. This is especially true for black kids. Any help here is greatly appreciated. I can do great designs on myself but I give them time to dry and I just don't have that time at events.

Also suggestions for the wiggly kids! I try to ask them to sit still but I don't know that that helps. I'm in the greater Philadelphia area if any friends are as well!

Thank you!

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Re: Painting on wet paint

Post by Forest-Fairy on Mon May 11, 2015 11:34 pm

What brand of paint are you using?

If it's Glycerin based (Snaz, Mehron, Aquacolor etc) then these paints typically are easier to blend because they take longer to dry, it's also pretty hard to paint a good white of the same brand over top of them. But using a wax base white and black for over top of a glycerin base works great and this practice is pretty common among face painters.

If you are using a wax based paint (DFX, Wolfe, Tag, Global, Fab etc) then this should be less of an issue, and drying time should be quicker too. So i get more the feeling you are using a glycerin base brand of face paint.  

But no mater what brand you are always going to have a bit of color bleed when trying to paint white on top of rich colors.

Wiggly kids, i make sure they are relaxed, and some times i tell them to 'wiggle their toes' if it tickles, and also some times remind them to breathe. Lots of kids try to hold their breath or slow their breathing while getting face painted, not sure why, but it happens a lot.
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Re: Painting on wet paint

Post by Tineke on Tue May 12, 2015 11:58 am

work your paint... If you're rushing things, you likely used too much water and didn't really work for a good water/paint balance...
If you find that balance (I spray my paints once with my mister, and work the sponge untill all the water is gone... sounds like it takes long, but it really doesn't) you never have to wait for paint to dry. I jump straight from sponging to linework without waiting, and use almost all glycerine based paints for bases... (linework varies between glycerin and wax based)
On really sweaty kids I use starblends for bases.

Give the really wiggly kids - like seriously adhd kids - some wiggling time each time you're not working on their face: when you grab a brush, load your sponge, etc... You'll paint a bit slower, but you want feel depressed when you see the paint afterwards Wink
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Tineke

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Re: Painting on wet paint

Post by jlirie on Tue May 12, 2015 12:02 pm

you probably already know this, but you can try to paint details starting with the dryer part of the base.

for example, lay down the first part of the base coat on the area you need to do the most details (like the forehead or side of the face for tiger stripes). then as you finish the other areas of the base, the first part will be drying.

when you do the details, go in the same order, so you paint over the driest part of the base first.

for wiggly kids, i have found that's just their nature. paint fast and don't try to do a lot of details, simplify the design as you go, if you realize you have a wiggler Smile
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Re: Painting on wet paint

Post by MelindaT0813 on Sat May 16, 2015 8:25 pm

So when I paint I drop the base down and then do the extras before doing line work.

1. Base
2. Puff glitter on to the base
3. lipstick
4. MOAR GLITTER!!!! on the lips I mean Wink

At this point everything should be dry and ready to go. If it isn't you are probably using the wrong type of paint or setup for your area (example: A glycerin base, out doors, 100°).

Another suggestion I have is make sure the color you are using for line work is mixed enough. If you are using a super thin and wet white it is going to be dull AND pick up the color under. Keep swirling your brush till the white thickens and then wipe of the extra.

LAST suggestion:

Make sure your sponge is not too saturated. If the sponge has too much water in it then it won't pick up the color well AND it will take longer to dry.

You can submerge OR spray your sponge and the squeeze it hard in your hand to wring all the water out.

Now the sponge is moist but not soaked.
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Re: Painting on wet paint

Post by rthling on Sun May 17, 2015 9:05 pm

Sometimes humidity is a problem in tropical Tennessee, so the base doesn't dry fast enough for me, before I'm ready for lines and details.
The simple solution is to go over the base with a dry sponge.
Boom.
Problem solved.
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Re: Painting on wet paint

Post by sarahkvotta on Thu May 28, 2015 9:09 am

You guys rock. I have a party this weekend for lots of little princesses. Theses tips are super helpful!!
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Re: Painting on wet paint

Post by Forest-Fairy on Thu May 28, 2015 5:10 pm

I forgot I wrote this Razz

10 Tips For Faster Face Painting

#10 at the top talks about proper loading of you brushes and sponges.

One thing you'll hear me repeat a lot is 'Don't swirl your brush!' I explain in depth about in my blog link there, but here is an excerpt


me wrote:Besides water, the most important thing about loading paint brushes is direction. Obviously with flat brushes you know to go back and forth, or else it will mess up your bristles. But did you know the same is true for round brushes? All to often I will see painters swirl their round brushes. Don't make this mistake.

What does this mean for speed? Simple - less time reloading your brush and going back for more paint!

I can tell which artists swirl their brushes by how their paints look. I call them 'Pot Holes!'



Hitting the bottom of your paint cake is normal and usually the middle is the first part to go, but notice the steep holes in the photo? Those types of holes aren't from being gradually worn down, those are from swirling the brush in one spot over and over. Avoid having that great hole to China in your paints - load properly.

Not only does swirling your brushes also mess up their natural alignment which will cause them to fray and split, but you also aren't picking up as much paint as you would by loading the brush back and forth.

By swirling the brush, you are picking up paint but mainly on the outside of your brush, and also the paint is a mish-mash and not pointing in the right direction. Imagine your paint like little rivers on your brush. When you swirl your brush the paint is loaded horizontally instead of vertically, so the little rivers have trouble flowing off the brush as effectively.




Don't believe me? Try it right now. You'll find that once your load your brush with the natural alignment of the bristles of the brush, your paint is able to 'flow' out of the brush much better, smoother, and most importantly, for longer.
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