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The "process" of painting

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The "process" of painting

Post by graphicdetails on Sat Oct 02, 2010 1:18 pm

Ok, this is a very beginner question, but I can't seem to find anything in my search.

I remember when I was a kid and painting with watercolors, the process was paint one color, rinse your brush in the cup of water, use the next color, rinse in the cup, etc.

But it seems from the pics that you all have many brushes and sponges in your kits. For someone just getting their feet wet, what is the best process for facepainting? One sponge for every color or do you rinse sponges? And I assume with brushes you certainly rinse between colors because that could add up to a lot of brushes in your inventory.

I have found many posts regarding beginner paints and colors, but what should I have for brushes and sponges, and what is the process for using them while facepainting?

I haven't purchased anything yet and was thinking of going to AC Moore to get that book with the Wolfe paints. I've seen it there before and that may be a good start for someone like me.

Thanks for any help with such a beginner question.

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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by Perry Noia on Sat Oct 02, 2010 1:54 pm

There are a lot of different ways to do it, there are some out there who use one brush per colour and one sponge per colour all day.... most don't.

I use one sponge per child, rinse between colours obviously, but once that child is done, so is that sponge for the day. It's sort of about germs I guess, but I don't think changing the sponge does much more than LOOK more sanitary from that point. It's mainly about the sponge getting over saturated with water and other colours and ending up a big mess really. At least in my book.

I only use 4 or 5 brushes usually, I could survive with 3 I think.... medium round, liner and my butterfly brush. Using the right tool for the job at the time makes things easier and faster once you get the hang of them.

The main thing is going to be, what works best for YOU and your style of working. The wolfe book with the paints is ok, but it's mostly cheek art. If you can find the Usborne book, it's just as beginner, but it's full faces which I find are easier and much more impressive.
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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by Fabtastic on Sat Oct 02, 2010 2:02 pm

I am a beginner too, so take my advice with a grain of salt! Very Happy But what I have observed is - different painters do things different ways. For some it is personal preference, for others it is due to safety regulations set down by health authorities in their area.

My daughter has painted for years and she always uses a fresh sponge for each kid. Me, I sort of have a sponge dedicated to each colour for the day, because I find that there is so much paint wasted otherwise. Either way, we have a big mesh bag of sponges and we do not rinse them until the end of the day. And of course, if the sponge somehow gets icky throughout the day, I will throw it in the bucket and grab a fresh one for that colour.

My daughter always rinsed her brush between colours, whereas I have some brushes that are dedicated to black and to white. I just find it is faster, and my water doesn't get dirty as fast. The other colours I do rinse in between. I use a popsicle tray for my brushes, so I have a "white brush" hole and a "black brush" hole, then the brushes that go in the other holes are sorted mostly by size or type.

As for buying sponges, I have found the round yellow sponges at the dollar store, package of 2 for a dollar, and I cut them in half. So they cost me about 25 cents per sponge, and I started out with 12 but have just bought three more packages so now I will have 24. My daughter just bought regular rectangular household sponges and cut them into wedges. Many people recommend the car-washing "peanut" sponges or tack sponges (I'm not sure what tack sponges are).

I have bought a number of different brushes, to try different types, brands and sizes. Oddly, my favourite one came out of a very cheap combo pack I bought at Walmart (unfortunately the paint is peeling off the wooden handle). I also like the Royal soft grip ones, they are very comfortable to use and have an acrylic handle so there is no paint to come off. I bought a couple sets of 5 of those at Michaels on sale for $9.99 each (orig. $22 or so). The one set came with an assortment of rounds, and the other came with a variety including flat, chisel, liner, etc. So for $20 I got a nice bunch to work with. I did buy one Kolinsky, not sure if I like it yet or not, it's not my favourite one that's for sure.

Well I rambled on a lot but I hope some of this is helpful to you!! Very Happy
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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by graphicdetails on Sat Oct 02, 2010 3:45 pm

Oh wow, I guess I am certainly learning. I didn't realize the "everyday" sponges from the dollar store would work acceptably.

Perry, I'll have to look for a book with that name.

Thanks for the help. When I get a chance I'll have to look at some more old posts. Everything seems to be jumbled in my head and I feel like I'm just not putting it all together, especially when I see some pictures of these master set ups you all have! I was just going to get a few brushes, paint, and start painting someone!

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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by Fabtastic on Sat Oct 02, 2010 4:04 pm

Well, that's the way to start - just jump right in! You don't need a master setup, you really really don't. I had the good fortune of having my daughter's kit to work with when I first started, I saw no sense spending money on the chance that I wouldn't enjoy it. But, I LOVED it - so I started building my own kit. And she gave me a lot of bits and pieces that she didn't need, so my kit has filled up quickly. But if I remember correctly, my daughter started with the Snazaroo 8-colour palette, a few brushes from Walmart and a household sponge that we cut into wedges.

Once you try it, you will love it and want to try all sorts of different things!! I've just ordered some of the neon rainbows from Metina, can't wait to play with them - but you don't need stuff like that to begin. You are right - you just need to "get a few brushes, paint, and start painting someone!" Very Happy
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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by Perry Noia on Sat Oct 02, 2010 9:37 pm

http://www.amazon.com/Usborne-Book-Face-Painting-Make/dp/0794502369

I started with the Snazaroo Professional Walkaround Palette because it came with some sponges and brushes and a wide variety of colours. I still use Snazaroo almost exclusively, but I need bigger pots of colour now.
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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by Psalmbook on Sat Oct 02, 2010 9:50 pm

I use a sponge per child & I like to double & triple load my sponge. This lets me lay down all my base colors in one step.

This pic from my step-by-step shows what I mean when I say triple loading the sponge.
[

I use different paint brushes for different techniques. I like to rinse my brushes regularly & just change my water frequently. I find that if I leave the paint on the brush it causes the brush to expand as the paint builds up & makes my linework sloppy. I have 3 cups for rinsing the brushes & rinse in 3 steps. This way I always have a cup w/ clean water.
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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by JBax on Sun Oct 03, 2010 12:19 am

There are lots of differing opinions on this, and some folks are very, um... passionate... about their own way of doing things. So, it'll end up being a try-and-see on your part to see what works for you.

I like one sponge per kid. I also load multiple colors on each sponge, so it's just easier for me to toss it in the "dirty" garmet bag when I'm done with it.

I like rinsing my brushes instead of having a dedicated brush for each color as well. The paint builds up and spreads out the hairs if it goes too long without a rinse anyway, and again, I'm not organized enough to pay attention to which color brush I need.

Some folks HATE "coffee water." (this is prevented by not rinsing your brushes) When my rinse water gets murky, I toss and get more water. I always wet my paint with clean water (spritz the cake or dip brush in the clean water cup) so the condition of my rinse water just isn't big on my priority list. It has to be clean enough to rinse the paint out of the brush.

I have various kinds of brushes (I invested in a set of Vargas brushes at FABAIC cause I fell in love with them, so I know what I like now) but really only have a few of #4 rounds as far as multiples of the same kind.

It would be sooo much easier if someone could say "This is how everyone is supposed to do it" but really, it's trial and error. Go to a craft store, try out some brushes on the back of your hand (I'm partial to white taklon), go over to the paint section and pick up some round sponges, and have at it!
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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by Psalmbook on Sun Oct 03, 2010 7:15 am

That is true. Some people don't even use sponges for the base & prefer using a brush. It's what works for you. It's fun learning & then when you think you've got it, you find something new!


Last edited by Psalmbook on Sun Oct 03, 2010 3:07 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by graphicdetails on Sun Oct 03, 2010 10:41 am

Thanks for all of your opinions. I will get some things to get started and see how it goes.

You folks who use 1 sponge per kid must have a TON of sponges in your arsenal to get through an entire gig!

Perry, I can check out that book for free because our public library carries it! Very Happy

Thanks again.

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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by Perry Noia on Sun Oct 03, 2010 3:04 pm

That's great! It's a good book to start with, but it won't be something that you'll need to go back to long term, so borrowing it is probably a good idea.
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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by Psalmbook on Sun Oct 03, 2010 3:13 pm

I do have quite a few sponges. I cut the round sponges in 1/2, so I get 2 for each one I buy. I figure & need about 25 sponges an hour(since I can paint about 20 kids an hour). I usually carry about 50 sponges to a 2 hour event. I haven't run out(but have come close Very Happy

BTW, just to clarify, not any sponge will do for face painting. What the other poster was writing about was the car wash sponges from the dollar store(the peanut shaped ones). You can cut them into manageable wedges. I've also bought the green cushion material from JoAnne's(fabric/craft store) & cute them up to make sponges.
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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by Perry Noia on Sun Oct 03, 2010 10:21 pm

oh and tack sponges are little round sponges that look just like the ones you buy from the face painting supply places (and have the same texture, etc) that are available at horseback riding supply places (a tack shop)... they are used to clean saddles, but work perfectly well for face painting and are a LOT cheaper.
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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by graphicdetails on Mon Oct 04, 2010 12:09 pm

I appreciate the clarification. I will probably purchase some regular facepainting sponges at first just so I can get an idea of what the heck I am looking for! Laughing

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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by BluAngL83 on Mon Oct 04, 2010 12:53 pm

IMO on Sponges: I noticed there is a difference in how each type of sponge picks up paint and applies paint. For me the ones with lots of holes tend to use more paint (ie waste paint) and need to reapply layers for that nice blended/solid look. I tried the round sponges from ac moore and yeah they worked, but nothing like the Wolfe High Density Sponges (firmer) or the green fantasy sponges (softer but blends wonderfully). Buy thats just me. I would say buy a couple of different sponges from snazaroo, wolfe, green fantasy, paradise, ac moore, etc... to see which works for YOU.
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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by BluAngL83 on Mon Oct 04, 2010 12:55 pm

Oh and i tend to use one sponge per color/ split cake so as not to waste paint. I sometimes preload a color from a popular split cake onto my sponges before the gig so as to not waste too much time loading it.
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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by Lady Jayde on Mon Oct 04, 2010 2:01 pm

graphicdetails wrote:

You folks who use 1 sponge per kid must have a TON of sponges in your arsenal to get through an entire gig!

.

You'd be surprised...possibly appalled. I have cut my round sponges in half and some in quarters. I'm about 50/50 sponge brush usage here. I only bought 3 packs of sponges and i've yet to go through all of them in a gig...more like the equivalent of a single pack...but that just how i paint. I am strictly one (or two) sponges per child though.
LJ
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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by fluttersby on Mon Oct 04, 2010 2:38 pm

I am new also, but I love to pick up all the knowledge I can from these boards. I read about the tack sponges on Shannon Fennel's blog and she says she gets them from a tack shop but I found them at Tractor Supply. I picked up the last pack they had. There were 12 in there for I think $9.99 and I cut them in half so my sponges were 50 cents each. They work pretty well, but the paints I got are very tiny and they don't fit them well. I also got a dollar pack of rectangular sponges at the dollar store and cut them in strips and I can swipe them on the small paints and it seems to work just fine. I can't wait until I can get some of the larger pots of paint. I should have known, but didn't realize just how small they really are inside those palettes.
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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by Shelley Bellefontaine on Mon Oct 04, 2010 3:33 pm

sponges are the cheapest part of my kit Laughing Yes I do go through quite a few during a gig, but I am a one sponge per person painter!I would not want someone applying my makeup with a sponge that had been used on someone else.
When buying sponges PLEASE make sure that they are latex free! Yes there are makeup sponges out there sold in the $ stores that do contain latex, so just be careful!
There are classes /jams and conventions all over the place now. For anyone really wanting to learn, I HIGHLY recommend training!
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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by fluttersby on Mon Oct 04, 2010 3:47 pm

Oh how I wish there were some jams or training anywhere near me. One day I may be able to travel down state to attend something, but not right now. Therefore I am so thankful for everyone here.
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Re: The "process" of painting

Post by CottonKandyClown on Mon Oct 04, 2010 5:39 pm

I've had 5 gigs over the course of a yr so I'm still new at this, too. Cool

Sometimes I'll switch from a sponge to a brush depending on the childs age and the size/shape of their face. I think I like sponges most times though.

I use the little round tack sponges you get in the paint caddy section at AC Moore or Hobby Lobby. You can get them in bulk on Ebay. I just ordered 30 and cut them in half. Some designs don't require a sponge so if I do 30 faces, rarely do I use 30 sponges(more like 15-20). Some designs like a tiger, might need two seperate sponges. I do prefer to use a sponge per child. It's easier for me and less messy.

I use about 5 different brushes, but could get away with 3.

1 3/4 Flat Brush
1 #0 round brush for white
1 #0 round brush for black
1 #4 or #5 round brush for smaller faces
1 #6 round brush for larger faces
1 butterfly-cut fan brush

Now, I am in love with certain brushes and plan on buying more. I like to have several for different colors.

I will say that I have wasted a lot of money on cheap brushes when I started doing this as a hobby. Getting good brushes is very important. You can get great brushes here on the Forum Store or on SillyFarm. Most of those you can also find in a craft store, if you have one near by Wink



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